Changing Inside Out Now!

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Inspiration for Moms - What Moms Know About Communicating Without Words

How do you communicate with someone who cannot yet speak your language? As a mom, you learn to develop the essential skills of communicating without words when nurturing your child. Our children have given us the invaluable opportunity to be able to understand their needs even when they are unable to verbalize them at a young age. 

What are some of these skills have we developed in order to establish our relationship with our babies? And how can we use these skills to establish and develop our relationship with the Great Universal Spirit so we can be empowered from within? 

Let's look at 5 learned skills and how they can empower us. 

1) Spending time with baby

Even though you may have more than one child, each of them has their own unique personality and special way of communication. As a mother, you learn to discern them in each of your children through spending time with that child.

Our time with the Spirit causes us to recognize when the Spirit communicates with us in a way in which we can clearly understand. We develop that unique relationship as we spend that quiet time together. This relationship is strengthened each day as we become more consciously aware of the Spirit's presence and are willing to engage in conversation with the Spirit.

2) Observing - Understanding baby's needs

We use our observational skills to understand our baby's needs. We tend to those needs immediately as required. E.g. through observation you can tell when your baby is choking or is cranky because she needs to sleep. You can immediately act on what you observe to help your child.

Through observation, we can follow the guidance of the Spirit. We gain understanding and insight to know which direction we should go. We also discern when things have changed and can make adjustments as we work with the Spirit to help us come through whatever situation we are facing. 

3) Listening closely

As a mom you can tell the difference in a child's cry. One cry says, "I'm tired and need to sleep." Another cry says, "I'm hungry and need to eat." And yet another says, "I don't like this position that I'm in and I'm getting ready to scream if you don't move me now."

Our listening skills also develop as we become more in tuned with the Spirit and we are able to know and understand what the Spirit is saying to us through circumstances, events, nature and even those around us.

4) Paying attention - Knowing what to do

When we are paying attention to our babies, when we are present, we can read their body language, understand what they're trying to do and take action to help them.

As we are paying attention to the signs of the Spirit, we can take the necessary actions to help ourselves reach our goals. Often times the 'road signs' are there to help us along the way but we miss them because we're preoccupied with worry or loaded down with stress that we're unable to see what's being shown to us at the time.

5) Being creative

As a mom, being creative becomes a way of life. You learn to pull up on your creative skills when you have to care for a baby and yet still carry out your other chores. I'm sure you could recall some of the things you've had to do in order to get your other chores done. I know I have to change strategies often and implement new ones as the situation arises.

Your ability to pull up on those creative ideas comes as you ask the Spirit for help in order to reach your goals. Certain ideas may come to you that make you marvel at your own ability to be creative. Your creativity will help you overcome many difficulties as you allow it to flow.

What other skills have you learned over the years as you raised your children? As you go down memory lane, observe your experiences closer and see which of these skills you can apply to the situation you're going through right now. I'm sure you'll be able to find some nuggets that could help you. Some you may never have thought could be used in other areas of your life. 

2 comments:

  1. Great anology, I really got the sense of that.
    Thanks!
    Tracey

    ReplyDelete

Daily Insights

There was an error in this gadget