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Thursday, February 11, 2010

Inferiority Complex: How to Overcome Inferiority Complex


If you've ever felt the effects of an inferiority complex, you'd know how it affects one's confidence and ultimately one's self-esteem. Inferiority complex usually comes as a result of you comparing yourself to or someone comparing you to someone else or to a particular "standard" of behaviour or lifestyle.

We all love the feeling of approval and acceptance. When you rely heavily on the approval of others and not on your own personal approval of who you are, inferiority complex can have such a negative effect on you and hinder you from living your life to your fullest potential.

Inferiority complex originates from within. Yes, what others say may have an effect on you but only if you accept that external perception of who you are as your own.

Overcoming Inferiority Complex

1) Take stock of who you are

Examine yourself and know your strengths and your weaknesses. When you take the time to do a self-analysis it can better equip you to deal with negative criticisms from others. If you are not aware of your strengths or even your weaknesses, ask a trustworthy friend or family member to help you identify these areas.

2) Shift your perspective

As you know and understand your strengths, shift your focus from the area you feel inferior about and onto your strengths. Practice this shift of perspective every time you begin to think of or feel your confidence and self-esteem shaken. Encourage yourself in the process. Your self-talk is most important here to move you from a state of negative thinking to positive. You may say, "I may not be good at that just yet but I'm great at this." Keep your focus there and elevate your emotional vibration to a positive level.

3) Acknowledge your weaknesses

When you identify your weaknesses, it puts you in a better position to strengthen them or look for ways in which you can enhance those areas. You're making a clear separate between your strengths and weaknesses so the thoughts of your weaknesses do not overpower the positive aspects of your strengths. Sometimes we focus so much on the negative so we end up 'throwing the baby out with the bath water' so to speak. Your weaknesses do not define who you are or determine your worth.

4) Strengthen or enhance your weaknesses

What are you willing to do to strengthen this area? If you're overweight, find a trustworthy source for selecting correct foods to eat and an exercise routine for you to follow. Until you get to your ideal weight, begin at once to dress in way that makes you feel good about yourself. Okay, you may not like the way you're looking right now, but if you begin to pamper yourself - wearing some makeup, change your hairstyle - this simple gesture will put you into a positive mood.

5) Surround yourself with positive people

If you're struggling with reading or spelling, surround yourself with friends who are strong in those areas - those who will help you. Choose your friends carefully. When you hang around positive people you become fired up to be the best you can be and the encouragement to keep trying.

These strategies can get you started to look at your life in a positive light. When other people make negative remarks with the intent to make you feel inferior, allow your strengths to be the answer. The key is to practice focusing on your strengths and accepting you for who you are.



2 comments:

  1. Thanks for the post, Alicia. All of what you wrote is so true. I think positive self-talk is very important. We all have our "little child" still living inside of us. We must nurture her and let her know how special she is. It's hard to get rid of old tapes but that is what we must do in order to go forward. Thanks for all your posts, by the way! Love reading them. Sincerely, Susan from writingstraightfromtheheart.blogspot.com

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  2. You're welcome Susan. It's amazing how we grow physically yet our inner memories are sometimes widely of childhood incidences. Many have not learned how to move.

    Thanks. Susan

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